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OPED: Texas Nationalism

Posted on 8/24/2012 by with 16 comments

By: Jesse Newberry, Guest Contributor *

Patriotism is the love and support for one’s nation. Nationalism takes patriotism to a deeper level where a person completely identifies themselves with their homeland. I will not question President Obama’s patriotism. However, he tells us he does not believe in American exceptionalism and continues to lead us down the pit of globalism. Therefore, President Obama does not fit the definition of a nationalist.

Most Texans fit the definition of a “Texas Nationalist.” In our core we hold a unique sense of pride about our homeland. Texans are proud of our unique history from a small group of Texas patriots procuring independence for our Republic to where we are today. Texans get “uppity” when someone talks bad about Texas. We are tickled to hear that some kid in Africa can readily sketch a drawing of Texas but has no clue what an “Iowan” is. Many of us consider ourselves “Texans” before “Americans.” Our pride runs from the oil filled deserts to the Piney Woods and from our gulf shore refineries to “Amarillo by Morning.” We find it amusing when an “outsider” complains how they have driven all day and still there is no end in sight to Texas.

 

Texans have a unique appreciation for freedom. We offer a large bulk of volunteers to the U. S. military and feel we deserve better than what we get from the federal government. When the topic of independence arises we hear the retort “How could Texas survive on its own”. The reply is simple, “Very easily. How can Texas continue to survive being a member of a dying body?” Texas is vastly under-appreciated by her fellow states. It seems others either love us or hate us. Recently I read an observation that an outpouring over Texas “arrogance” ranged from “send in troops to crush their spirits” to “let them go, good riddance.” But not once did anyone say, “We are all Americans.” They refuse to acknowledge Texas’ contributions. Due to our productivity and fairly sound business policies, Texas is the “life support machine” to states who practice irresponsible fiscal behavior. They fail to realize that they need Texas; Texas does not need them. As the cynic says, “a friend in need is a friend we don’t need.”

 

The world’s history is full of massive empires gone by. As they collapsed, their citizens carved out niches of land and said “this is our home.” The trend continues today. Most recently the people of Sudan had a falling out and their people voted on separation. South Sudan was created. The people (and even their government) basically agreed “we aint mad. We just want to determine our own destiny.” And so they have embarked into autonomy in a bloodless election.

 

Perhaps you can balance a pyramid on its head, but it will not be long before it blows over. And so it is with governments; when the government becomes bigger than its base, it is only a matter of time before the winds of change tip the balance and the entire system is altered forever.

 

People of Texas are tired of going to elections and having to decide who is the least worst candidate. Because of the bloat of Washington D. C. where they have surrounded themselves with so much red tape that improvement is impossible and freedoms are lessened, I joined the Texas Nationalist Movement. Texas can do better. Texas deserves better.

 

John Steinbeck once noted that “Texas is a nation in every sense of the word.” A famous Texan once said, “Texas is the finest portion of the globe that has ever blessed my vision.” That was Sam Houston in 1833, before they were faced with the War of Independence. And it is still true today. He later said, “Texas will again lift its head among the nations. It ought to do so, for no country upon the globe can compare with it in natural advantages.”

 

These are words that help source the “Texas Nationalist” pride. We are the Lone Star. We hold dear our constitution which says in Article 1, Section 2: “All political power is inherent in the people ….. they have at all times the inalienable right to alter, reform or abolish their government in such manner as they may think expedient.”

 

*Jesse Newberry, 38, is a lifelong Texas citizen, and father of five. Jesse spent over eight years in the funeral service and is now involved in the merchandise relocation industry.  Jesse was invited to contribute after a spirited debate on our Facebook page.  We are happy to have Jesse as a contributor at the Texan Post.

 

16 responses to OPED: Texas Nationalism

  1. On August 24th, 2012 at 1:25 pm , Thomas Collier said...

    Jesse, well said. I have had the unfortunate experience of living outside of the Great Republic of Texas for 10 years now and there is not a day goes by that I don’t miss my homeland. One of my three daughters was born in Texas, but, all three of them know more about Texas than anywhere else. They are all Texas girls at heart and none of us can wait to be back home. Keep up the good work and thank you.

  2. On August 24th, 2012 at 2:54 pm , ward lawrence said...

    During the 1970′s people from up north came down to Texas because the unions made jobs scarce. Jobs were more available down here in Texas because of our right to work laws.

  3. On August 25th, 2012 at 12:21 am , Jesse Newberry said...

    Thank you all for the kudos and shares. However, I neglected something in my bio- I am married to a wonderful woman. (and it’s being repeatedly pointed out that I forgot to add that. Sorry, baby.)

  4. On August 25th, 2012 at 8:23 am , Phil M said...

    This is a must read. I just shared it as well. Thank you for writing this and thanks to the Texan Post for publishing.

  5. On August 25th, 2012 at 5:53 pm , Catherine Partin said...

    And President Obama’s job is WHAT?…….. Why was that particular reference to President Obama’s globalism….And why is it important that President Obama’s “nationalism/patriotism” doesn’t fit its definition of such……. on another matter,I’m a Texan American female voter who agrees with the rest of the article. Kuddos.

  6. On August 25th, 2012 at 6:12 pm , James said...

    I have to admit that I thought the Obama jab seemed a little out of place given the context of the rest of the article.

  7. On August 26th, 2012 at 2:15 pm , curt wallace said...

    Thank you Jesse for an amazing article! The Obama jab as you call it is right on! I don’t consider the truth to be a jab. I am 53 yrs old and lived in our great state my whole life. I do believe in the TEXAN spirit and the U.S. is lucky to have us!! Keep up the good work Jesse and I look forward to more!!

  8. On August 26th, 2012 at 11:26 pm , Jesse Newberry said...

    Thank you all for the comments and compliments.

    @Catherine, if you took that to be a “jab” at President Obama, my apologies for not clarifying that as an example. I pointed out that I would not question his patriotism because it is a futile debate.

    I pointed out his globalism because he holds the office of highest representative of our nation to the world and he does not fit the textbook definition of a nationalist.

    It was intended as an example, not a jab. Sorry if I wasn’t clear on that. Thank you for taking the time to read my article and for the kudos.

  9. On August 26th, 2012 at 11:28 pm , Jesse Newberry said...

    I meant to address that to James as well. Apologies. I’m on mobile. It’s….. Mobile.

  10. On August 27th, 2012 at 8:12 am , Laura Parr said...

    Hey Jesse, great article. I’m a brand new Texas national, I like Texas so much that I bought a home here a couple of years ago, brought my mom down here and am actively trying to bring down the rest of my children(I followed my youngest child). This IS a great state, what else can be said.
    BTW in reference to the merchandise relocation industry, are you a truck driver? My sister and I called ourselves commodity relocators.

  11. On August 27th, 2012 at 11:52 am , Jesse Newberry said...

    Laura, heh heh, yes. Friend of mine told me it would have sounded better as “commodity logistics engineer.” Usually I say “merchandise relocation specialist.”

  12. On August 27th, 2012 at 1:46 pm , Dave Mundy said...

    Very well-written Jesse — as a journalist, I appreciate a commentary that lays the facts out there without the rhetoric we so often find ourselves lost in.

  13. On August 27th, 2012 at 8:51 pm , Ken Gaynor said...

    A polite, but serious, note to those of you who do not like the intent of the post above: You are an unfortunate soul, and I pity you. Most likely, you have the distinct (and unsolvable) disadvantage of not being a native-born Texan. That cannot be changed, but if you will give the Lone Star State your heart, and do your best to become one of us, we will begin to accept you. Over time, as you prove your desire to become a Texan in mind and spirit, and show it consistently with your actions and words, our acceptance will grow. Give us time, for you are the foreigner. If you are by birth one of our number and you do not like this, you are suffering from some sort of dysfunctional malady, the cure to which will never be found by mankind. Those in the latter group will please begin immediately to make plans to leave this fine land, and return it to its rightful inhabitants, the ones who do love it. There you have it; Love us or leave us, but DON’T MESS WITH TEXAS!

  14. On August 27th, 2012 at 10:01 pm , Jesse Newberry said...

    @Ken Gaynor,
    I’m guessing you are the one who reprinted my article on the “should Texas secede” website. If so, or whoever reproduced it, I’m flattered and thank you for keeping it and the credit intact.

  15. On September 25th, 2012 at 6:40 pm , Michael Bell said...

    Thank you for such a well written piece Jesse and as a “new” Texan I feel the same as you. I came here from the Pacific NW and everyday I wonder what took me so long to move here. Texas is everything that I believe in and I’ll never leave. As Ken Gaynor said DON’T MESS WITH TEXAS!

  16. On April 3rd, 2013 at 3:48 pm , hozro said...

    Excellent OPED!

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